Tag Archives: Alta

Plaintiffs Challenge Alta’s Snowboarding Ban as Unconstitutional

January 15, 2014 – Wasatch Equality, a Utah nonprofit, together with four snowboarders have filed a lawsuit against Alta Ski Area and the U.S. Forest Service today, in an attempt to overturn the anti-snowboarder policy and snowboarding ban that are currently enforced by the resort. The plaintiffs claim that the prohibition violates the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The lawsuit states that Alta treats snowboarders as unequal by not granting them access to the public lands on which the resort operates.

Alta is one of only three remaining U.S. winter resorts that ban snowboarders from their slopes, the other two being Utah’s Deer Valley and Vermont’s Mad River Glen. Unlike the other two, however, Alta runs under a Forest Service Permit, which states that the public lands “shall remain open to the public for all lawful purposes.”

“Discrimination without any rational basis perpetuates inequality by creating, fostering, and encouraging skier-versus-snowboarder attitudes that are hostile and divisive in a world where skiers and snowboarders, as a general matter, share the mountains, including those on all other public land, in harmony and without issue,” states the complaint filed in the U.S. District Court.

You can read the full text of the complaint here.

Where to Find Cheap Lift Tickets in Utah

Image Credit:  Winter Park Resort, CO

If you enjoy Utah winters for their skiing and snowboarding opportunities, but are trying to keep things under a reasonable budget, here is a list of places offering discounted lift tickets to different resorts. Have fun on the slopes!

Ski ‘N See

Ski N SeeSki ‘N See is a local chain of shops specializing mainly in skiing and snowboarding equipment, but they also offer discounted lift tickets. Here is the list of adult rates for this season. You can buy them in any of the chain’s locations, except for the Park City and Deer Valley stores.

Park City: $84
Canyons: $84
Deer Valley: $96
Deer Valley Jan. Only: $87
Snowbasin: $76
Alta: $74
Snowbird Peak (Weekend/Holiday): $80
Snowbird Off Peak (Mon-Fri): $75
Brighton Day: $64
Brighton Night: $30
Solitude: $70

Other stores offering similar discounts include Canyon Sports, AJ Motion Sports, The Lifthouse, REI (for members only), Wasatch Ski Connection and Salty Peaks, among other stores. They all have deals with the resorts, so you can get these discounted prices throughout the season. You can also check with your local Harmons or Costco.

Liftopia

LiftopiaLiftopia offers great lift ticket deals on certain days of the week. The site has a limited amount of tickets at any given price and you usually have to buy them a few days in advance of your actual skiing/snowboarding date. Here are some of their best offers as of Jan. 4, although you can find more offers on their site. The availability and prices change a lot here, so if you notice something you like, you may want to get it asap.

Park City Jan. 15, 20, 22, 27, 30: $73.50
Alta Jan. 15: $59.99
Alta Jan. 6-9, 13-14, 16: $63.99
Snowbasin Jan. 15, 21-22: $56.99
Snowbasin Jan. 14, 23: $58.99
Snowbasin Jan. 20, 24, 29: $59.99
Snowbird Jan. 13-15: $70.49
Solitude Jan. 8: $59.99
Solitude Jan. 15: $57.99
Solitude Jan. 13-14, 27-29: $58.99
Solitude Jan. 24: $59.99
Sundance Jan. 6, 13, 16-17, 21-27: $30.99
And here are some resorts that sell affordable lift tickets directly through their sites. You might want to give these a try as well.

Sundance

SundanceSundance has a lot of affordable options to choose from, although the rates below are not available on certain days and their holiday pricing differs too. You might want to check their site for more info. It offers fewer trails than other resorts, but has great views and no lines for lifts.

Full Day (9am-4:30pm): $55
Half Day (12:30pm-4:30pm): $45
Super Day (9pm-9pm): $61
Night Full Day (12:30pm-9pm): 55
Twilight (2:30pm-9pm): $39
Afternoon Pass (2:30pm-4:30pm): $26
Night Only (2:30pm-9pm): $31

Powder Mountain

Powder MountainPowder Mountain has a lot of terrain for skiers and snowboarders of every level. Prices are lower here because of it’s somewhat remote location, although it’s still within an hour drive of most places around Salt Lake. Besides regular skiing and snowboarding, the resort has several adventure activities like snowkiting, powder expeditions and cat skiing, and offers great discounts to locals.

Day Pass: $65
Half DayPass AM: $55
Half Day Pass PM/Night: $56
Day/Night Pass: $69
Night Pass: $22
Sundown Only Day: $38
Locals Day (Mon-Thu) with UT ID: $50
Locals Half Day (Mon-Thu) with UT ID: $40

Wolf Mountain

Wolf MountainWhile it’s less popular than Utah’s mainstream resorts, Wolf Mountain still has a lot to offer, especially for beginner skiers or intermediate ones who don’t mind trading a high amount of lifts/trails for a good deal. It’s located at a lower altitude than the other resorts in the area, but Wolf’s prices are pretty hard to beat.

Adult 12-Hr Wolf Pass (9-9): $36
Adult Day Pass (9-4): $32
Adult Morning Pass (9-1): $23
Adult PM Pass (1-9): $29
Adult Night Pass (4-9): $21

Alta

AltaAlta is one of the only two resorts in Utah (the other being Deer Valley), and one of the three in the U.S. that prohibit snowboarding. So you might want to skip this section if you are a boarder, sorry 😦

If you are from out of town, you might not be aware of this deal. Alta offers 1.5 hours of skiing for $10 after 3 p.m. Once you buy your initial card, you can reload it anytime for just $5. And if you have an Alta season discount pass, you can ski for free after 3 p.m. This is good for only three lifts, Sunnyside, Albion and Cecret. The first two close at 4:30 p.m. and Cecret closes at 3:30 p.m., so you only get 1.5 hrs out of the whole deal, but if you are trying to test your new skis (or your new skills 😉 ) and do a couple of quick runs, it might be worth it. You can find more details here.

Your Turn

If you know of any other great deals, please share! Also, if you end up using any of the deals we’ve listed, let us know about your experience.

I wanted to thank The W for helping me do research for this article.